Being at Home: Part I

I am asked often enough, if I get bored being “at home.” The 10-15 hours I spend editing a week are veiled to most people. And besides, the question is valid, in that, majority of my time is spent in the more traditional sense of stay-at-home-mom.

I am not in the least bit offended by the question. I am well aware that for educated women in North America it is no longer the majority choice, or economical option (Gallup, 2012; UPI 2012; Census Bureau, 2011). It is only natural to wonder about the taboo, especially when it tags with it, for many women, feelings of digression.

(Precursor: For those who sincerely question how God is using my new gift, I offer as genuine of a response as I can in that moment. For the times the question takes on a patronizing tone, I am tempted to ask if they are ever bored during their 8-10 hour cube day, or if they ever question what lasting impact their customer service is contributing to their legacy or the world…)

I am convinced that most of America is hoping to find self-worth via their job in the form of: recognition, status, affirmation and/or wealth. I am also convinced, that most people do not find their jobs fulfilling this hope. I believe this is because God did not intend for us to.

Our worth is found in His acceptance and promises. Yes, how we exercise that divine worth should shine brightly in our work contexts and our relationship with Him should inform our work decisions and use of talents. But if we look to our duties to  satisfy our deepest needs of affirmation, we will find every job is our short straw-at home or elsewhere.

In my short stint, I have found one thing to be true. Being a great “stay at homer” has very little to do with actually “being home” and much more to do with the creation of meaningful goals and then tactical daily to dos that support accomplishing them. For some moms and wives, this may mean that they are mostly home. Often for me, this brings me outside of my home. I have found, undoubtedly, that my administrative, creative, spiritual and relational function has heightened in this last year as a stay-at-home mother and wife, than it ever did as retail marketer, product production specialist or even teacher.

It is not a passive job. If you approach it passively, then, like any stakeholder in an organization, you have little fruit to show and are most likely bored and displeased.  In fact, it is a very true statement, that my early post-college professional years seem to have served much like an internship, preparing me for the weight of now.

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